In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World

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University of California Press, Jan 27, 2010 - History - 296 pages
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The transatlantic slave trade forced millions of Africans into bondage. Until the early nineteenth century, African slaves came to the Americas in greater numbers than Europeans. In the Shadow of Slavery provides a startling new assessment of the Atlantic slave trade and upends conventional wisdom by shifting attention from the crops slaves were forced to produce to the foods they planted for their own nourishment. Many familiar foods—millet, sorghum, coffee, okra, watermelon, and the "Asian" long bean, for example—are native to Africa, while commercial products such as Coca Cola, Worcestershire Sauce, and Palmolive Soap rely on African plants that were brought to the Americas on slave ships as provisions, medicines, cordage, and bedding. In this exciting, original, and groundbreaking book, Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff draw on archaeological records, oral histories, and the accounts of slave ship captains to show how slaves' food plots—"botanical gardens of the dispossessed"—became the incubators of African survival in the Americas and Africanized the foodways of plantation societies.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Food and the African Past
6
2 African Plants on the Move
27
3 African Food Crops and the Guinea Trade
46
4 African Food and the Atlantic Crossing
65
5 Maroon Subsistence Strategies
80
6 The Africanization of Plantation Food Systems
100
7 Botanical Gardens of the Dispossessed
123
8 Guineas Plants and European Empire
139
9 African Animals and Grasses in the New World Tropics
155
10 Memory Dishes of the African Diaspora
177
Notes
187
Selected Bibliography
239
Index
261
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About the author (2010)

Judith A. Carney is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author of the award-winning book Black Rice: The African Origins of Rice Cultivation in the Americas. Richard Nicholas Rosomoff is an independent writer.

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